Hotel review

Wales hotel review: Inside The Bull pub with rooms in Anglesey

Great British boltholes: Inside The Bull in Anglesey, which has historic charm, stylish rooms, gourmet food and a convenient location

  • Mail on Sunday’s Lizzie Enfield visits this Welsh gem and loves the ‘beautifully preserved bar’
  • The 12 bedrooms offer plenty of cozy nooks, oak beams, Welsh textiles, toiletries and tea and coffee
  • Coach Restaurant serves “pub classics with a fine dining twist” and emphasizes seafood

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It’s unusual fame, but The Bull, in the Anglesey resort of Beaumaris, boasts the largest single-hinged door in the UK.

It hangs at the entrance to the pub’s large courtyard garden. Inside the main building, it’s warm and cosy, with many nods to its long history as a former coaching inn.

The bar is lined with antique weapons and an 18th century duck.

Cosy: Lizzie Enfield dined at The Bull’s restaurant, Coach, a ‘spacious contemporary extension’

A bustling social and commercial center in the late 15th century, The Bull served as the headquarters of Parliamentarian General Thomas Mytton during the Civil War.

Almost a century later, in 1733, it was put to more peaceful use as one of Anglesey’s first Quaker meeting houses and the location of the Beaumaris Book Society.

Savvy guests will notice that the Bull’s 12 bedrooms are all named after characters from Dickens – the writer, then a journalist, stayed here when covering the sinking of The Royal Charter off storm-ravaged Anglesey in 1859.

Inside one of the bedrooms, all named after characters from Dickens when the writer stayed here

Inside one of the bedrooms, all named after characters from Dickens when the writer stayed here

These comfortable and luxuriously appointed rooms offer plenty of cozy nooks, oak beams, Welsh textiles, toiletries and Paned Pen Llyn Fairtrade tea and coffee.

All is calm and cozy inside Mr Stiggins, our luxury double named after the disreputable evangelist of the Pickwick Papers.

Here, an antique desk and chest of drawers contrast with the modern velvet headboard and matching chaise longue. Pretty Celtic-patterned bowls and slate coasters adorn the bedside tables, while the expansive en-suite bathroom with separate shower and freestanding tub looks distinctly un-Dickensian.

The buffet breakfast consists of pastries and cereals with compotes served in glass jars, or there’s a full Welsh with black pudding and cheese and laverbread scones.

This set us up for a day exploring Beaumaris, with its World Heritage-listed chateau, elegant Victorian terraces (designed by famed taxi cab Joseph Hansom) and its many cafes, bars, art galleries, gift and snack shops. antiques. A windy walk along the Wales Coast Path takes us to Penmon Point, the eastern tip of Anglesey which overlooks the Puffin Island bird sanctuary (boat trips available).

The hotel is located in Beaumaris, which has a World Heritage-listed castle (pictured) and a handful of cafes, bars, art galleries, gift and antique shops

The hotel is located in Beaumaris, which has a World Heritage-listed castle (pictured) and a handful of cafes, bars, art galleries, gift and antique shops

Lizzie took a windy walk from the hotel along the Wales Coast Path to Penmon Point, the eastern tip of Anglesey.  Pictured is Penmon Lighthouse

Lizzie took a windy walk from the hotel along the Wales Coast Path to Penmon Point, the eastern tip of Anglesey. Pictured is Penmon Lighthouse

Back at the Bull’s beautifully preserved bar, a gin and cask ale awaits before dinner in the Coach restaurant, a spacious contemporary extension. Expect pub classics with a fine dining twist and an emphasis on local produce and seafood.

We ate spicy tomato soup with meatballs of cave-aged cheddar and sticky pork belly, followed by wild mushroom guinea fowl and slow-braised lamb shank.

With historic charm, elegant rooms, gourmet cuisine and an ideal location, The Bull has much more to offer than just a grand door.

TRAVEL INFORMATION

The Bull, Beaumaris, Anglesey. B&B from £130 per night (bullsheadinn.co.uk).


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